A Pigasus for Daryl Bem

Every year on April Fools day, James Randi hands out the Pigasus Award. Here is the announcement for the 2011 awards, delivered on April 1 2012.

One award went to Daryl Bem for “his shoddy research that has been discredited on many accounts by prominent critics, such as Drs. Richard Weisman, Steven Novella, and Chris French.”

I’ve called this well deserved but there’s certainly much that can be quibbled about. For example, these critics are hardly those who delivered the hardest hitting critiques. Far more deserving of honorable mention are Wagenmakers, Francis and Simmons (and their respective co-authors) for their contribution of peer reviewed papers that tackle the problem.

A point actually concerning the award is whether it is fair to single out Bem for a type of misconduct that may be very wide-spread in psychological research. Let’s be clear on this, his methods are not just “strange” or “shoddy” as Randi kindly puts it, they border on the fraudulent. Someone else, in a different field, might have found themselves in serious trouble with a paper like this. Though I think it very hard to get such a paper past peer review in a more math savvy discipline.
But even if you think it is just a highly visible example of normal bad practice, surely it is appropriate to use the high visibility to bring attention to it. Numerous people have done exactly that. Either using it to argue for different statistical techniques or to draw attention for the lack of necessary replication in psychology.

I doubt that Randi calling this out will do much good since I doubt that many psychologists will even notice. And even if, I doubt that it will cause them to rethink their current (mal)practice. There’s a good chance that Bem will be awarded an IgNobel prize later this year. That probably gets more attention but even so…

 

The reactions from believers have been completely predictable. They have so far ignored the criticisms of the methods and so they ignore that Randi explicitly justifies the award with the “strange methods”. They simply pretend that any doubt or criticism is the result of utter dogmatism.

Sadly, some skeptical individuals have also voiced disappointment, for example Stuart Ritchie on his Twitter feed. Should I ever come across a justification for such reactions I will report and comment.

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